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Anyone rebuild a JLS airjack?

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99sh
 99sh
(@99sh)
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Joined: 10 months ago
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I need to replace the seals in one of my airjacks. My regulator didnt work as expected and pushed too much pressure.

 

There's little to no literature on servicing these things. Anyone have first hand experience?

Arax


   
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CharleyH
(@charleyhradicalsportscarregistry-com)
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Hi Arax (@99sh), it is very easy.  You can buy the rebuild kits fro JLS.   I will post some pictures tomorrow that show you how to do it.


   
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99sh
 99sh
(@99sh)
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@charleyhradicalsportscarregistry-com Awesome, thanks Charley!  I found the manual for the AP Racing unit, and the list of special tooling was incredible.

 

If you have PNs and where to buy that would be appreciated. I'm assuming XRP.com is the place, but they didn't have any part #'s of the internals listed.

 

I need to get my mistake fixed fast 🙂


   
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CharleyH
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@99sh, Yes I purchased the rebuild kit from XRP.  For my SR3 the XRP part number for the kit  was 870001.  One kit is required for each cylinder.  I also replaced the 2 washers (per cylinder) that are used seal the banjo fitting.  The XRP part number for these is 89142015.

The hardest part of rebuilding these cylinders was getting access to remove the cylinders in the side pod.  To remove the cylinder you simply remove the pneumatic lie from the top and then loosen the jamb ring to get enough slack to remove the mounting rings.  I used a universal spanner wrench to remove the jamb and mounting rings.

20140823 094411
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Once the cylinder is out of the car I used the spanner wrench to loosen the cap at the bottom of the air jack.  I then used a little compressed air to gently push the piston out of the cylinder.  If your seals are binding be careful doing this.

20140823 101749

 

This is what my seal looked like when I got it out. 🙄 I think what cause this for me was that I was using the air jacks without the support stands to hold the car in the air for long periods of time (days).  Once you get the piston out of the cylinder it is straightforward to change the seals.

20140823 101807

 


   
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99sh
 99sh
(@99sh)
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Perfect, thank you for the pictures. Looks very straight forward. Like you said the hard part is getting it out!

 

Googling that part #, I see it in their 2013 catalog. Same PN for 52mm units.

 

Thanks again Charley!! Hopefully I can remove this without taking apart too much other hardware!


   
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Clark Darrah
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For what it's worth, I contacted JLS about a question I had regarding the airjack and they were very responsive.  Here is what they told me:

"If you do attempt to disassemble the air jack you will only need to remove the small grub screws located in the end cap. Take care when doing so as if you round the hexagon inside then you will need to either force something larger into the rounded hex and hope it grips or drill it out (the screw is hardened steel so this can be a chore!). Once this screw is removed the end cap can be unthreaded from the cylinder body, revealing the main cassette. Clean the seals as best you can, we have a distributor in California (http://www.xrp.com&source=gmail&ust=1660053071041000&usg=AOvVaw1V_EBwRJR-8D8QtaAtPR0 i">www.xrp.com) who may have some stock of the replacement seal kits available for sale. Clean up the cylinder and inspect the inside surface for any scoring in case you have any further issues, and reassemble without the grease - unit should run fine then.

 
If the unit is working fine and you don't have the means to disassemble, then don't worry too much. The bearing where the piston rod extends from is not an air tight seal as air needs to escape for the rod to extend - only leak you need to worry about is an air/nitrogen leak as this will impact the air jack lift capacity."

   
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99sh
 99sh
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@clark-darrah Thanks Clark. This is all good info. I did find my rear air-jack to be off vertical and a bit of an angle. Strange I say. I need to look at the rear again, thought the brackets were welded on with no adjustability ?


   
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Clark Darrah
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@99sh yes, the rear bracket is welded to the chassis. 


   
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CharleyH
(@charleyhradicalsportscarregistry-com)
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@99sh, it isn’t uncommon for the jack mounting structures to get bent from “off track excursions “…


   
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